Community Rx Program Educates, Empowers, and Activates African Americans

BY ON March 11, 2019

Heather McTeer Toney

As a mother, I know that raising a child is never a solo affair. Especially as a working mom, I rely greatly on my own mother, my family, and my friends to make sure my son has what he needs to be happy and healthy. I count myself so lucky to live in such a vibrant and connected community where my neighbors are willing to pitch in and support each other no matter what. Communities like mine give moms the power we need to fight for our kids — and every child.

That’s why I’m so excited to introduce you to our new Community Rx program. Community Rx will educate, empower, and activate African American moms, grandparents, aunts, and more in the Southern U.S. to fight for clean air and environmental justice in their communities.

Why are we launching this program? Because these communities are on the front lines of America’s pollution problem

  • African Americans are more likely to live in more polluted areas and areas with lower air quality than any other group.
  • Black children are more than three times more likely to be admitted to the hospital for asthma-related issues than non-Hispanic white children.
  • More than one million African Americans live within half a mile of oil and gas operations and schools serving predominantly black students are located closer to heavily trafficked roads.

This injustice is unacceptable.

Through Community Rx, we are giving moms the tools to bring their communities together to learn about the environmental issues that impact children and families in their area. We’re also reaching moms in faith communities through our newly developed Bible Study Curriculum that draws on the connections between the gospel and our environment.

As we fight for better air quality, we must also fight for equity — because every single child deserves clean air to breathe, no matter where they live or the color of their skin.

JOIN MOMS CLEAN AIR FORCE

TOPICS: African-American Community, Air Pollution, Asthma, Social Justice