Regulations Every Mother Should Love: Mercury and Air Toxics

BY ON March 5, 2012

Woman sitting on roof with blue sky and clouds behind her
Moms Clean Air Force is not even a year old and we’ve already seen some important – even historic – accomplishments that will reduce air pollution and bring us closer to a healthy future for our kids.

But there’s much more ahead.

There are more than half a dozen other regulations or bills waiting in the wings that will have a profound effect on the air we breathe.

This week, we bring you a series of clean air regulations that every mother should love. Here is the first regulation to keep a close eye on:

Mercury and Air Toxics Standards

These historic standards put the first-ever national limits on emissions of mercury and other toxic air pollution from power plants. Power plants are the single largest source of mercury air pollution in America; they’re responsible for half of the mercury emissions. The new standards will save up to 11,000 lives per year.

Status: the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards were published in the Federal Register on February 16, 2012. That means they are officially “final” and will go into effect soon. However, opponents can still challenge the new law. They have 60 days from the date of publication to sue in court; Members of Congress also have 60 legislative days from that date to introduce a bill called a CRA, which would be one extreme way to undo the rule and would prevent the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from ever issuing a substantially similar rule again. Moms Clean Air Force will be fighting to protect the new standards, of course. Stay tuned!

READ MORE:
How mercury works

Mercury Q & A

MORE REGULATIONS EVERY MOTHER SHOULD LOVE:

Cross State Air Pollution Rule
Cement Air Toxics Standards

Ground Level Ozone and Particle Pollution

Fuel Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards


PLEASE TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT STRONG MERCURY AND AIR TOXIC STANDARDS

Photo credit: community.livejournal.com

TOPICS: Coal, Mercury Poisoning, Politics, Pollution

 

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